Thursday, 14 March 2019

Review:Tumbling Dice Pe-Dreadnoughts

Scale Shot Against A 10p Coin of The Realm

Pre-Dreadnoughts have always fascinated me. They existed in a brief slice of historical time between the iron clads and true battleships when naval architects were still experimenting with how best to mate steam power, steel armoured ships and long range shell firing guns into the optimum package.

Unfortunately, sources of models are limited.  I had even half convinced myself to buy the large 1:350 display models before sanity intervened.

Over at Cavalier, I happened to see a display of Tumbling Dice's Tsushima starter pack range of miniatures. I had previously rejected these because they seemed so small at 1:2400 scale but, on seeing them painted up in the, ah, pewter; well, they looked great.

And this  from a person who declines to buy and paint any model smaller than 20mm owing to fading eyesight and unsure hands.

The Doomed

The detail in these little ships is excellent. And they are beautifully sculpted and very hard edged making them dead easy to paint. They take washes and highlighting easily. There is absolutely no problem of distinguishing different classes of similar ships.

Togo's Tigers

Tiny little ships, like torpedo boats, come attached to sea bases. I am not sure whether I will bother to base their larger cousins. They look good as they are and, with a hard gloss varnish finish, should be reasonably robust to paint wear.

TD have many  models in their 'Age of Battleships' range with even more planned.

I can see myself collecting all Paul Sulley's Pre-Dreadnoughts.

Highly Recommended.



24 comments:

  1. They look great John - I am almost tempted ;)

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    Replies
    1. Blimey, that was quick out of the box, Rick. They are excellent models.

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  2. Indeed. I favour 1/600 and 1/4800th

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  3. If you can find and afford them (some online retailers/ebay sellers are insanely proud of their wares), American Battleships 1886-1923 by John C. Reilly Jr. & Robert L. Scheina, and US Armored Cruisers by Ivan Musicant are excellent reads on the development and construction (not so much the use in action however) of naval vessels in this time period!

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  4. Nice one John. I feel I should do more naval wargaming.

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  5. I have all the Tumbling Dice Russian ships and an opposing large Japanese Force. I have to say they are excellent ships.

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  6. Dear John,

    This is slightly in point.

    Ed, a friend's stepfather, served in the Pacific with the 22nd Marines. When the Japanese agreed to surrender but before the treaty was signed, there was quite a lot of concern about how ordinary Japanese civilians would respond to American troops

    Ed's company of about 200 men was landed at Yokusuka before the surrender was signed. They carried small arms but were not allowed any ammunition. These were veterans of the SW Pacific--Ed himself had been wounded on Okinawa, and he had buddies who'd served as far back as Guadalcanal. There was concern about what they might do to unarmed civilians if they were allowed ammo.

    While waiting for the surrender (which Ed watched signed from the shore) they wandered around Yokusuka. Ed was with a group which entered a building which was obviously associated with the Mikasa park. The Mikasa was Togo's flagship during the Russo Japanese War and had become an exhibit.

    A member of Ed's group saw the model of the ship in a glazed case and smashed it with his rifle butt. The aged caretaker was in tears. This bothered Ed a lot. He wasn't a bleeding heart and he'd seen a lot of things, but he remembered this with sorrow after fifty years.

    Wars do really bad things to people, even for the folks who survive them; as your dad certainly knew.

    All best,
    Dave

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    Replies
    1. Fascinating boat, the Mikasa. The last pre-dreadnought in the world still extant. Built in Britain for the Japanese navy.

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    2. She was actually sunk by a nationalist officer right after the peace treaty between Japan and Russia. The fellow believed that the treaty didn't give Japan her due and scuttled the Mikasa in protest.
      She was raised and returned to service.
      Dave

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    3. Strange people, the Japanese. Couldn’t he just have written a strongly worded letter to the Tokyo Times.

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  7. For Pre-Dreads i like Houstons Ships at 1/1000 scale. They have a range from 1866 to 1906. I cast and sell them in the States.

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    Replies
    1. Some photos of Houstons Ships here;
      https://wargamephotos.com/houstons-ships-photos/

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  8. Great! And I'm glad to send out catalogs to anyone snailmail. Just need address to Dkemperx2@aol.com

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  9. Sadly most of those pictures are from the ACW Houston Line which I do not have. Some are from the Pre-Dreadnought Line though.

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